Steps on the Road to a More Ethical and Peaceful World

Applied Ethics was founded in response to the reality of numerous major problems facing contemporary society, including war and systematic violence, global warming, extreme poverty, and the suffering cause by widespread and severe diseases and infirmities. While many people might look at these and see problems of engineering or economics, we see deep and pervasive ethical problems that require ethical solutions. Our work begins with the awareness of the place of injustice, ignorance, and selfishness Read more…

Applied Ethics and Pax Populi: Looking Back on 2013 and Ahead to 2014

Applied Ethics, Inc. was created as an organization dedicated to respond to the significant problems of contemporary society in ways that were ethically sound and practically applicable. Among the many major social issues, none struck us as more important than the dangers posed by conflict and war, and the need for peace. There may be a time when Applied Ethics will house many projects under one organizational roof. For now, however, our focus is almost Read more…

Applied Ethics in 2011: A Retrospective

As 2011 draws to an end, this is a good time to reflect on some of Applied Ethics’ accomplishments during the year. We are very proud of Shogofa, the Afghan student brought to study in the US by Applied Ethics/Pax Populi, who has just completed her third semester at Salem State University. For family reasons, at the end of the autumn 2011 semester, Shogofa returned to Afghanistan where she expects to stay for the next Read more…

Spring 2011 Sees Many Advances in Our Peacemaking Efforts

During the spring of 2011, Applied Ethics’ Pax Populi program made some significant strides. Here is a quick review. On April 30, 2011 a major Pax Populi event took place in Marblehead, MA, called, “Surviving the Taliban and Finding a New Way Forward,” featuring Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times journalist David Rohde and Applied Ethics, Inc./Pax Populi founder, Robert E. McNulty, PhD. The event was well attended and a very informative article appeared in Read more…

Applied Ethics’ Pax Populi Program Moves Forward

Pax Populi remains the heart of Applied Ethics’ work and it continues to progress at a good pace. We believe that 2011 will be an important year in this program. The most notable accomplishment has been the success in bringing our first Afghan student to study in the USA through the Pax Populi Educational Outreach program. Over the last several months we have also launched a few pilot projects which we have refrained from announcing Read more…

Welcome to America, Shogofa!

On September 3rd, Shogofa, the first Afghan student in Applied Ethics’ Pax Populi Educational Outreach program, walked through the gates at Boston’s Logan International Airport and into the warm welcome of her host parents, Paul and Claire, and the executive director of Applied Ethics, Inc., Bob McNulty. On a deeper level, she was greeted by America and committed peacemakers everywhere. For the complete Pax Populi posting, please click here.

Coming to America — Pax Populi Opens a Door

Three days ago Shogofa was given her visa to come to America to advance her education. We encountered many challenges and some setbacks, but in the end, our Pax Populi Educational Outreach succeeded in crossing an important milestone. Shogofa should be coming to America during the first week of September; rather than Marblehead High School, she will attend Salem State University. We encountered many challenges and some setbacks, but in the end, our Pax Populi Read more…

Pax Populi Educational Outreach Program

The goal of Applied Ethics’ Pax Populi Educational Outreach (PEO) program is to create opportunities for some young adults living in conflict zones — Afghanistan in particular — to advance their education through studies in the United States. We believe that one important way to help Afghans to bring peace to their country is by building a strong civil society, and that depends largely on education. For the complete story, please click here.

Poverty and Peace: Mining Discovery may Help Bring Peace to Afghanistan

It has long been my view that the source of conflict in Afghanistan results from a few factors, namely: poverty, a huge drugs cartel, an underdeveloped educational and civil society infrastructure, and a history of conflict. And among these, I would place poverty at the center. Today’s New York Times reports that huge mineral resources have been identified in Afghanistan and the value may be on the order of $1 trillion. This could be of Read more…